Worship Band Builder Podcast

Tips to create an effective worship set list every week - Episode 20

July 07, 2020 Eric Michael Roberts Season 1 Episode 20
Worship Band Builder Podcast
Tips to create an effective worship set list every week - Episode 20
Chapters
Worship Band Builder Podcast
Tips to create an effective worship set list every week - Episode 20
Jul 07, 2020 Season 1 Episode 20
Eric Michael Roberts

Show Notes:

ONE:  Organize your “big 50” into three sections; fast, mid-tempo, and slow.

TWO: Consider the state of your congregation, as well as the intent of the service.

 On a typical Sunday, you’ll want to open with a mid-tempo song. People will still be coming in, getting settled, looking to see who came to church, etc. This is also an ideal spot for introducing a new song, because they will start to hear and become familiar with it without any serious obligation to sing along. If it is a special day, with reason to celebrate, you can open with something up-tempo.

THREE: Construct a setlist that encourages worship.

 With the first song out of the way, you will see the congregation begin to participate more. Another mid-tempo piece is appropriate in spot number two, or a fast song. On the second song, people may clap along or raise hands, if that’s acceptable at your church. Putting a slow song in the second spot is, generally speaking, a hindrance to the flow of worship. It’s a little like asking someone to marry you on a first date. It’s just too soon.

FOUR: How long is your setlist?

 The tempo of song number three depends on the length of your set. Many churches, like ours, have a three song setlist.  In this case, the third song is the last song, making it a good place to put a slow song. If you have the luxury of a four song setlist, your third song could be mid-tempo or slow.

FIVE: Offering

If you have music during the offering, consider how long it typically takes for your offering to be collected. At some churches, it does not take as long as a 3 minute song. In that case, an instrumental excerpt from one of the songs in your setlist is a good choice. Just once through the verse and chorus may be enough. If you’re at a larger church and offering takes longer, this is an ideal place for a solo or “special”. It’s also another place where a new song may be introduced.

SIX: The Closer.

 Typically, it’s nice to end on a slow song, in order to allow the congregation to reflect on the sermon. However, if you know ahead of time that the preacher is speaking about spiritual victory or some other rousing topic, then sending people out on a high note is the way to go. A fast song is ideal here. The closing spot is also a good place to include a special song or new song.

Learn more at http://www.worshipbandbuilder.com


Show Notes

Show Notes:

ONE:  Organize your “big 50” into three sections; fast, mid-tempo, and slow.

TWO: Consider the state of your congregation, as well as the intent of the service.

 On a typical Sunday, you’ll want to open with a mid-tempo song. People will still be coming in, getting settled, looking to see who came to church, etc. This is also an ideal spot for introducing a new song, because they will start to hear and become familiar with it without any serious obligation to sing along. If it is a special day, with reason to celebrate, you can open with something up-tempo.

THREE: Construct a setlist that encourages worship.

 With the first song out of the way, you will see the congregation begin to participate more. Another mid-tempo piece is appropriate in spot number two, or a fast song. On the second song, people may clap along or raise hands, if that’s acceptable at your church. Putting a slow song in the second spot is, generally speaking, a hindrance to the flow of worship. It’s a little like asking someone to marry you on a first date. It’s just too soon.

FOUR: How long is your setlist?

 The tempo of song number three depends on the length of your set. Many churches, like ours, have a three song setlist.  In this case, the third song is the last song, making it a good place to put a slow song. If you have the luxury of a four song setlist, your third song could be mid-tempo or slow.

FIVE: Offering

If you have music during the offering, consider how long it typically takes for your offering to be collected. At some churches, it does not take as long as a 3 minute song. In that case, an instrumental excerpt from one of the songs in your setlist is a good choice. Just once through the verse and chorus may be enough. If you’re at a larger church and offering takes longer, this is an ideal place for a solo or “special”. It’s also another place where a new song may be introduced.

SIX: The Closer.

 Typically, it’s nice to end on a slow song, in order to allow the congregation to reflect on the sermon. However, if you know ahead of time that the preacher is speaking about spiritual victory or some other rousing topic, then sending people out on a high note is the way to go. A fast song is ideal here. The closing spot is also a good place to include a special song or new song.

Learn more at http://www.worshipbandbuilder.com


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