Worship Band Builder Podcast

Five Must Do Audio Tips for Awesome Live Stream/ Church Audio / Episode 24

August 04, 2020 Eric Michael Roberts Episode 24
Worship Band Builder Podcast
Five Must Do Audio Tips for Awesome Live Stream/ Church Audio / Episode 24
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Worship Band Builder Podcast
Five Must Do Audio Tips for Awesome Live Stream/ Church Audio / Episode 24
Aug 04, 2020 Episode 24
Eric Michael Roberts

learn more at http://www.worshipbandbuilder.com

Support the show (https://worshiptheking.com/partner/)

Show Notes Transcript

learn more at http://www.worshipbandbuilder.com

Support the show (https://worshiptheking.com/partner/)

Speaker 1:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

Hi and welcome to the worship band builder podcast, where we are working with you to lay the foundation for skillful worship. I'm Eric Roberts and I'm joined by my lovely cohost Emily Roberts. She's here. She's ready to go. And she's got the entire plan, this whole podcast in her ready and I'm ready because like I was saying, we already did this and we had to redo the whole thing. Almost it's technical stuff,

Speaker 1:

Technical difficulties. Okay .

Speaker 2:

Physical difficulties. We can do this twice and it's fine. Cause you only have to listen to it once, but we're going to be talking about live streaming twice. The fun for us, we're talking about live streaming and it's perfect because we had this episode half done and I realized that my live streaming device had stopped at 10 minutes. So if that happens at your church, Oh my goodness. You're going to be hearing from your pastor on Monday morning. It's always weird. I look over at the guy who's doing the video and he'll be like, it froze. It froze. Oh no, it didn't froze. It's fine. It didn't, it didn't freeze. So I get froze . It froze. Oh no. And we all start sweating and we're like, Oh no, no, it's fine. So that's how it feels to live stream. Or if you just go home and listen to the live stream mix, some of you guys, and you're like, Oh my goodness, what happened was it sounded like this. This is what we've been talking about. I've been with my church for about three months. Since the lockdowns happened every week, working on our system, maybe four ,

Speaker 1:

We have been at the church longer. He has been responsible for the livestreaming for the last three or four months.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. I've been working and we've gone through little things last week. We had our best, I think our best mix and check the YouTube channel because I'm showing you the mixes. I'm critiquing my own mixes throughout this period and showing you like things I changed to make it better. And also if you want to, you can join audio foundations, which is part of the foundation's bundles, that worship and builder. And if you join with this podcast code, what's , Emily's going to tell you, you get 20% off. That means you'll also get all the webinars in the, in the really in depth training for you and your team. And a lot of what I'm talking about over this last quarter has been live streaming, which can be completely devastating or it can be fun, but you're going to have to make it fun and get ahead of it. So what is the code?

Speaker 1:

So if you want audio training for your church at 20% off, that's 20 folks.

Speaker 2:

Sorry. That sounded like commercial . So I added that in

Speaker 1:

Then , uh , type in audio podcast 20. Yup .

Speaker 2:

When you go to the link in the description for foundations , for audio, you can type in what is the code ?

Speaker 1:

Audio podcast 20. Okay .

Speaker 2:

Thank you for that code. That's very kind of you and it'll be 20% off or you can join the entire church bundle, which is guitar, piano, voice, drums, everything. You can go check it out.

Speaker 1:

I feel like we need a xylophone and some backup singers. Yeah,

Speaker 2:

I think that'd be cool. Cause the backup singers in the studio, well today's episode is our five. What we call crucial essential. The five things you must absolutely do. If you want your live stream to sound good and not sound terrible.

Speaker 1:

We're going for good folks. If there was a question terrible , the one you don't want .

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no don't sound terrible. So first of all, we're going to try to bust through this. On the other time we were doing this, I was getting really in the weeds and I'm not going to get all in the weeds. I'm going to just give some outlines of the five things that you have to do. If you're not doing these things, it could be the one thing that could be like, Oh, that you might be doing three of these and the , or four of them, but it still sounds bad. And that can happen with these things because

Speaker 1:

Any one of these things could make or break, well, not make one thing cannot make the sound. No , all five of them must be in play to have a good sound . So one of these things could break your sound quality. Yeah .

Speaker 2:

One of these things could break down for you could be just at one thing away from your pastor going like that sounded amazing too . What are you doing in the sound booth? Like what is, what is going on? So number one, a little scary. I'm a little intimidated. Be intimidated. I'm intimidated. Every time I turn on the sound system and think I got to get all of these right . And all of this is working in my brain and it's all coming out in the end. And that's why I liked going back and critiquing and listening to, and one thing livestreaming has done for us, I believe our worship band, everything is it's made us really listen and go, Oh, we should change that. Or we could fix this. So it's also a journey, a journey to getting better. Our guys in the beginning, they said every week, we're just going to get better. That's the key. Just get better every week. And that's all you can do. So this week was one of my best weeks. Uh , and I'll tell you why in a , in a, in a bit, why did I did something? I tweaked something and it made it a lot better. Uh, also I'm just getting my template for logic down really well, which I'm going to give you guys that template as well, get in the description. I'm going to put a link to help you guys get my logic template. And I'll talk more about that. Number one is level level coming in to the live stream has to be perfect.

Speaker 1:

The level from the main board front of house board, going into your laptop.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Into my laptop. Yep . That's what she's saying. It goes from our mixer into our computer, which runs logic. And from there, it goes from the computer that makes , goes into the ATM, I think many pro it's the black magic switcher. And from there that goes to Facebook. So there are, there are some levels of complexity that we now have. We have a lot of new equipment because of this. So we used to just have a soundboard and the levels would go to the front of house. And that was all you worried about. Now you have to go into the computer, you mix it there, you send this perfect level over to your mixer, your live mixer that goes to your video switcher. That's the video switcher should have a way to see what the level is coming in. And then that's going to Facebook. So, and very, at the very end of the stream, you want to check at the live Facebook feed. Yes. This sounds good. One week we had kind of made it too low. I was worried about peaking . So I had turned the volume down and we're just getting to know this equipment. And the pastor was at home that week listening. I think somebody was filling in or he was on vacation and he was like, texting. It's gone . I can't hardly hear I've got my computer all the way up. And I can't hear so because we had just run the level too low to the mixer, to the Facebook feed. It just messed up the whole thing. So the other bad thing you can do, if you're not monitoring your level into your final Facebook mix , you know , into your, your, your streaming device, you can overload that if you get into the red, so your, your fader has green, yellow, red. You want to be at the top of the green and the yellow, but never hit the red or just barely touch the red. But when you get to red, you have peaked and you get digital distortion, which sounds like, should I go ahead ?

Speaker 1:

Maybe not that exactly. But some approximation of ,

Speaker 2:

Yes, it's , it's, it's not like the old days where it might be cool if you overloaded a power amp and it kind of sounded like distorted and cool. It sounds like some of them just sound like just all kinds of weird digital , uh, like robots. Okay. That's what's going to happen. And if you, so at the end of the day, the level's important. Keep your eye on it, keep it up there to where it's nice and strong, but not peaking. Also make sure you're monitoring your level from , at every stage it's gain level. And it's really, when we talk about our five minute soundcheck , when you're coming into your mixer with a microphone, the first thing you always are going to do is set the game . And this is sort of gain structure all the way to the end. Now we're talking about the end of the chain. All the way to the Facebook live feed is that sound have enough level to produce a good sound, but not be overblowing the speaker . So levels. Number one, if you don't get this right, everything falls apart.

Speaker 1:

Okay. What's number two.

Speaker 2:

Number two is EEQ equalization. So the lows , the mids, the highs you got the low, the nice mellow sound. You got the mids, which is like a lot of where our voices are and where we kind of sing . And you got the highs, which is like the clarity. So if you hear some, somebody singing in a mic and it's like, Oh, this sounds muddy. They probably are lacking highs, right. Or if you hear something, you hear the bass player playing and it's just like rumbling. It sounds real. It's probably got too much lows . So this is, this is what you want to start to do in your mixing in your ear queuing . You need to be thinking about those things now. I think that's, I think that's all I want to say about it .

Speaker 1:

Okay. Um, what I want to say about this in general is that you're, you're referring back to the in house sound right and comparing it to the live stream sound. So if any of this terminology is unfamiliar to you , um, this is all stuff that is covered in the foundation's audio training.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. In a lot of depth and in, and on our YouTube channel, there's a lot of free videos on there to check those out. But when I'm talking about gains and EQs , especially IQ , which is our important thing, you can't send a big muddy fat signal to the live feed and think that it's going to sound good on computer speakers. It's probably just going to sound distorted and gross, and people are gonna be talking and it's not going to be clear. So you have to be paying attention to number one, every single channel on your board, your vocals, or guitars or drums, the EEQ on every single channel. And then maybe even the EKU on the master fader of your live stream . So there's, EEQ on every channel. So you just got to deal with that. And I'm going to show you a number three, how IQ even went into our effects. Number three is effects. So the most important effect, and really the only effect that we're using in our live stream right now, the audible effect is reverb. There are other effects like, or say, I would say there are things that change. It sound like compression and all that. So we use a little bit of that stuff. And, but the one that we've listened to in here is, is called reverb. And that's kind of like when you sense , you know, yell down a cavern, you know, the last time you're standing at the top of a cavern and you yelled down in there. Yeah. Well we were, yeah , almost. We almost went into a cave yesterday. Right. Or we thought about it. We did , we went to waterfall, but we thought about going to these, remember those cavern things like exit here to go to a cavern.

Speaker 1:

Uh, well, we didn't seriously consider that. That was, that was far away. That's why I didn't understand where you were going with that. Yeah. Okay. We digress. So reverberation is the echo effect. That's the in , and that sound changes according to what size room you're in, in, in real life. But

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And that's right. She's right. If you're in a, and when you look at reverbs on boards, you'll see like big hall, small hall, big room, small room, you know, concert hall, cave, cavern. I mean their sizes of rooms. And what, when you talking to this, you can , you can just basically hear that's a , and maybe I have some Reaver , but if you're talking to no microphone and then you turn a cavern reverb on it , it sounds like you're in this huge hall or cavern. So we're not going to do that. But here's how I use, I guess I should just tell them how I use reverb, why it's important. If you don't have any reverb on your main mix, on your main mix or on your, at least your vocals, then everything sounds super dry. So check out some of my YouTube videos where I talk about reverb, check out some of those videos where I kind of can show you that the amount of reverb you want to use, you want just enough reverb to where it sounds natural. That's the key a mix, a live stream mix with no reverb. Okay. Sounds unnatural and makes the musicians sound bad. Really sound bad, especially the vocalist. So if you're singing into what I would call it, dry mic , there's no reverb and nothing. And you put that into a live stream . It sounds terrible because there is no room. There is no context when we're in a room and you sing into a mic, it goes through the speakers and then it bounces around the room. And there's this natural feeling of the room because you are in a room, right? When you're on your computer, in your headphones, or when you're sitting in your living room and you're listening through this little speaker, there is not really a big room. There's not a, you're not replicating that room. You sound, you hear this person singing. It's very dry, very harsh and reverb just changes that for everybody, for everything. And , uh, the second thing I'll tell you is this is number four, the room Mike, the room Mike. So that's our fourth one.

Speaker 1:

Okay. The room Mike is contributing to this reverb that we're talking about

Speaker 2:

Really F three and four is effects , which is like reverb and then room Mike, which is like the Ninja trick. Really? And it's , it's just about recording the room. So when you have the audience singing or when you have that natural room sound, if you put the right mix in the right place, in your room and you just record those and put those into the live , uh, the live Facebook feed mix only, you know, when you're mixing front of house, you don't have the room. Mike coming back through this,

Speaker 1:

You wouldn't need it because you're actually in the room. Right?

Speaker 2:

So what we do is we put a couple of mikes up, or I just have one. Now it's sort of in the middle of the room, it's a big it's it's whatever. It doesn't matter too much what that is. As long as it's a , like a nice condenser microphone, you can stick it anywhere. Mostly I stick it just in the middle of the room, over on the side , uh, the optimal placement would probably be in the dead center of the room, right? About head level, where everybody is, but that you can't put a microphone in the middle of the sanctuary people looking at it, funny and stuff, not going to over

Speaker 1:

Knocking it over would be the real danger.

Speaker 2:

What I do with this in the live stream mix. Only, I just turn up that room, Mike, until it feels natural until it sounds like I'm in the room with them. So I've got my headphones on. I'm mixing that mix. And then I turn up that room, Mike , just until I can perceive it. As soon as I perceive it, then it's enough. I've perceived that I'm in the room with them. And if you do this, it will change the quality, the tonal quality. It is really an engine trick . People won't notice it's there. They're like , Oh, I'm glad they're using a room mic today on their mics , but they'll just listen to it and be like, wow, that sounds, you know, and if the crowd were to sing or to clap, you can hear some of that in that mic. So it sounds more natural and little bit of bonus. I think we have time, a little bit of a bonus on this this week was my best live stream mix. And it was because I had like an aha moment. I was driving in the car and I was like, Oh, though , whenever I added the reverb to our mix early on a couple of months ago, I noticed it was dark. It was a little muddy. And I was like, okay, that's fine. I'll deal with that later. And I just moved on and I was just working on other stuff. But the other day I realized, Oh, there's an ICU setting in the reverb unit. And I went in and I , and I took out all the low end of that reverb unit. So I put a big, a high pass filter on it, basically scooped out all the low end. And then on the same thing, I forgot to tell you this on the room, Mike , I did the same thing. I was like, Oh, well the room Mike probably doesn't need to be picking up the bass guitar because our bass guitar has been really loud. We've got a new guy mixing the room has been sounding really full, but the bass is now like overwhelming. And so it's, it's um , too loud in the room, Mike . So I swept out all the low and out of the room, Mike , and then the whole mix just got clean on the top end. It just sounded better.

Speaker 1:

Well, this is a good thing to tuck away in the back of your brain, but added to that , um, I think it's important to note that running the sound requires a certain amount of guessing and checking.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. Yeah. Guests check guests , check a drive around. Think about it. If something's not right, you get, there is a solution. If you're driving around thinking that sounds really muddy, then go to these five pillars. Like I'm not , we haven't gotten to five yet go to these things. Is it acute ? Is it the reverb? Is it the room? Is it the, is it the, is it the way I'm mixing the thing? Well, we'll get to that. Number five. What is it? That's , that's making this change. That's making it sound weird. Our mix has been, most people have been telling me, Oh, it sounds great. It sounds wonderful. And the pastor's really happy, but I'm still like, Hmm , let me see what I can do. Let me see what I can. I feeling like it's a little bit too muddy, but what's that? How am I going to get the clarity out of the vocals? How am I going to get, you know , uh , this to sound better so that it's , it's continual, you know, ch guessing and checking. Yeah. Try stuff out. You know , uh , one of the guys that came in, he said, Hey, your room mic is too. He said, it's weird. It's up in this place. He didn't like the way it was kind of places. It'd be better if you put it back on the soundboard and use the different kind of mic . And I was like, you know what, that's a good idea. I never thought of that. So I had that kind of mic . He was talking about, I put it up there and it was just too far away from our stages , very long room and it didn't work. So I used it one Sunday. I was like, that didn't work. So I think if we move that mic up halfway and dropped it from the ceiling, it would probably be perfect, but it was too far away. So it wasn't able, so I was just testing. It was like, that's a good idea. Ask some people what they think, try some different things and then go, yeah, no, that didn't work. Uh, as long as you're moving forward and getting better, that's the key,

Speaker 1:

Right? I think listening critically and not dismissing those things that you notice, but giving them the attention they deserve is necessary for that forward movement.

Speaker 2:

Right. And then number five. Alright . Number five is something I talked with Emily and we did a training when she had to fill in like last minute, I was like, all right , we got to do this. Let's, let's do this. And there's a video in the audio foundations and it might also be on YouTube. So check it out there . Mix anatomy. Okay. And it's from the bottom to the top, how you set up your mix and every little piece of that mix, it's , uh , starting at the base drum, then the snare, then the overheads, then the bass guitar. And I showed her if you turn everything off, because a lot of times when you come into a mix, you just start listening to stuff and it's just like all there and it's a mess. And it could just be one thing like the keyboard that's causing everything to be terrible. So I like to build my mixes fresh almost every time from the ground up and check them as I go from the bottom. And that's, that's, that's key. That's something I did this week. A trick that I did this week as well, that I think is what made the big, final difference. And I'll tell you that. So you start at the bottom and you always start at the bottom with bass drums , snare overhead . So you get the drummer and you're listening to them and you're mixing until the drums sound good drums, first drums and drums. If they sound good, the drums will be like the backbone of the whole band. So if you like, if your spine is crooked, you're going to look funny. You know? So my chiropractor says,

Speaker 1:

So we're comparing the drums and the bass to the , the skeletal structure that's holding.

Speaker 2:

Right. And generally more, more like, yeah, just the drums, even just that, just that drum beat and that , that clean drum. Then you throw the bass in there and then it becomes like that glue. And then you can put in the acoustic or the piano or the Pat and the pads and sort of some of those things that are in the mix, but aren't as important to the, like the skeleton of the mix. And then you want to put your vocals on top of everything, but not too far on top there on the edge of the knife at the top. So the there there's , um, there is this weird place where they're a little too loud and they're way too loud, or they're a little too low and they're hard to hear. So you're always, you're riding those faders during the live stream, your who's singing lead, who's singing harmony and all that. But once we started last week, once we started, I didn't touch the drums or the bass , I was like, that's it, my foundation, my skeleton is there. I was just worried more about like, who's singing. Is this an acoustic driven song? Is it a, you know, those kinds of things that I'm listening to as the service goes. Right , right,

Speaker 1:

Right. What about the electric? Should we have put that in before the acoustic or,

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it depends on the song. I mean, the electric in today's worship, it's a lot of like lead guitar . So you're going to ride that too . You're going to be riding the electric guitar. If he's just doing a bunch of chords and a bunch of theory stuff, then you're going to treat him more like a keyboard or a pad player. But if he's doing a line in the lamb and the intro, you're going to treat him like a lead vocal for just for a few minutes or, you know, for that, that intro, he's a lead vocal. And then you're going to pull them back down into the pad area. The other thing, the other trick that I did that I do is there might be two or three acoustic players on stage. I mean, sometimes there's too many, in my opinion, like, okay, we've got two people on acoustic and a keyboard and a play . We've got like too many instruments for a real live streaming mix . So in other words, you're not going to be able to hear every single acoustic and every single electric part and every pad and every keyboard all at once. And if you listen to the radio to really pro mixes, you'll notice you don't hear all those instruments at once. Anyway, they kind of become this. They become this sound, but then you'll hear an acoustic player. That's doing a riff or a lead, or you'll hear like a keyboard player come out. This is a nuances of a mix. So if you have two or three acoustics and two players and a piano player and a keyboard player, listen, you're going to pick, it might be hard for you to think this way, but you're going to try to pick what number , what acoustic up there is sounding the best, which one is driving the rhythm of this song. And the other acoustics are going to get notched underneath sometimes not even noticeable audibly anymore. You got to give yourself permission to do that. Guys, listen, I'm being honest with you. If you've got that many instruments, you're going to have to make some decisions. And it isn't about everybody's going to be heard at once. Then just have a really bad muddy mix, but you have the drums, the bass or your foundation. And then you start adding in like, this song is very, sounds very good with that electric guitar in there. Well, now the electric guitar has taken up a bunch of space and there's not much more room for like a keyboard or a pad and all this stuff. So you talk all those up underneath you leave them in a theorial realm where they're kind of there, but they're not noticeable. And then that's it. That's your mix . Same with vocalist . You got a lead vocalist. You've got your secondary harmony. Who's really tight. And if you've got three or four other singers, you know, they're going to be way underneath like Barry . They might even be like I sang today and couldn't hear myself on the live stream. I wasn't going to get into this today, but now we're getting into mixed anatomy, but this is this isn't like, I don't like this person. I'm just going to turn everybody down. Or I'm not being that way. I'm saying in a produced mix, there are certain things that have to be prominent and it might be this guy's guitar on this song. It might be that vocal on this song. And if you have a lot of stuff going on, there's no way to build a clean mix with all of that stuff. Some of that stuff is going to have to become background. It's going to have to verb. Doubt can have to become sort of that part of what I might call the bed of the them . It's there, they're in there. It's that, that underneath part of the mix, but the lead vocal is going to be on top, like in country music. And then you're going to have some vocals that are specifically underneath that lead vocal.

Speaker 1:

I guess what I would say about that is the stuff that you are mixing low is still an essential part of the mix. It doesn't make it less important just because it's not prominent. It's still , um, contributing to the overall sound of the song,

Speaker 2:

Right? And it , and it would be like this. Some of you have Dan's that are mixed acoustic driven bands or piano driven bands. And that's probably mostly like if the worship leader is a piano player, then it's going to be a piano driven band. Probably. So a lot of the songs are going to be driven by him. He's going to have a lot of lead parts. But if , if the worship leaders is acoustic guitar player, it's going to be predominantly acoustic driven band. That's just, I'm not saying that's great for PR . I'm not saying that's the way it should be. I'm saying that's generally how it is. So you're , you've got an acoustic driven worship leader and you're going to put his guitar in with the drums and bass make it all sound really good. And then you're going to sneak in the piano, sneak in the pads, put in the electric when it's necessary, sneak in the backup vocals underneath them. And that's how you're going to mix that mix. That's going to be your anatomy of that mix. Um, but you can't have it all. You can't have everybody's instrument up at zero and they're just playing. If you listen to some of your favorite music and just listen to it in your car and go, what am I hearing? You know, what am I hearing? Am I hearing sometimes even in rock bands, the electric guitar is kind of gone . The acoustic guitars really strongly. Maybe it's really soft, but the song is being driven by the drums and bass and a vocal line.

Speaker 1:

So we're getting a little off track of , um, achieving that live stream perfection that we're, that we're striving for. So let's quickly just review what are the five things again that we must have for good live sound? Yeah.

Speaker 2:

She's like come back to earth. Cause I'm about to talk about mixing all day. We got level. So get a good level going into N good , a good level going into your live stream device. Okay. And be able to monitor it, figure out how you can get a , get a meter on that. Okay. Then we have EEQ number two is EEQ the lows , the meds, the highs, make sure they're where they're supposed to be and start messing with them and start not being afraid to tweak them and then effects definitely get some reverb. Okay. You might want to lose a little compression , all that stuff, but definitely put a little reverb on every, on , on just the vocals. I didn't say that before, but I just put it on the vocals. Um, and then maybe a little bit on the master mixer and then the room, get a room, mic room, Mike and reverb. We're kind of married. They're kind of going to create the feel and the atmosphere and then build your mix . The anatomy of the mix from the bottom up, making sure your drums and bass sound really good. They're really solid. Everything else will sit on top of those. That's what I did this week. And I will tell them this final thing this week, what I'm doing is I'm listening through a pair of headphones. You know, they're powered headphones, she's there. She knows. And it's in , it's in the room. We don't have our mix , our logic mixer in another room yet that's going to be in a couple of weeks or a month as we hopefully soon because I'm listening to the room around me. And then I'm trying to hear in my headphones, it's kind of annoying.

Speaker 1:

It's really annoying. There's a lag in the time you got to really be able to block out the room, even with sound canceling headphones, it doesn't get rid of. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So to get really good at this, you're going to have to be isolated in another room, mixing for the live stream . Okay. So we're going to get there. But right now, what I did was in logic, I did this. This is I think what really made it this week because when the base is happening in the room and I'm trying to mix and I'm listening to my headphones, bass is usually all accentuated in the corners and it's loud and it's Boomi and you feel it. So in my headphones, I'm like, okay, I'm probably not mixing it loud enough, but having that drum base relationship and the mix is key. So what I did was I hit record during the first service I recorded about a minute of them playing, you know, and then during the pre service in the middle of the services, I listened to my headphones where the band was not up there. And I really listened to the drums and bass and I eat them and I put some compression on the bass drum and snare, and I just really tweaked them. And I turned them up to where they would sound amazing. And I, and I had just basically a good environment to listen. And then I just didn't touch them the rest of the service for the second service. And I just changed out the vocals and stuff like that. And then I went back and listened and I was like, Oh my goodness, that sounded amazing. I think I mentioned that I, that I queued out some of the reverbs , some of that low end and I just cleaned up the mix when the room wasn't booming around me. And

Speaker 1:

This is such excellent advice simply because our church is not the only church that does not have an isolated room for the live stream at this point. Um, in our case, the only service that gets livestreamed is the second service. So he could do that first service, you know, record a piece of it and , um, tweak it in between services. But you could do the same thing during a practice.

Speaker 2:

You could do it show up at rehearsal record, 15 minutes of rehearsal or 10 minutes. I only did a minute because our computer's kind of slow and I didn't want it to like start bugging out. So I'll just record a minute. And then I just looked, took , I looped to that minute and took five minutes and just, I listened to it five times and I just kept tweaking it. And then when I listened to the live stream this week, I was like, Oh my goodness, that sounds so good. That is really starting to get clean and clear. The drums and bass sounded good. And I was really happy. I added some reverb to the snare. All of this stuff is in my audio foundations , everything I do, I'm sort of logging it and blogging it and showing you, so if you're feeling overwhelmed, if you're feeling like, Oh my, you know, my brain is exploding. You have to go back to basics, setting, gains , setting IQ , all those things are in the foundations. And then as you go into the live stream mix, it's weird because then it just becomes etched in stone, on Facebook for everybody to hear, and everybody can critique it all week and everybody can listen to it. You know, when you're just mixing front of house, you can mess something up. And it was like, Oh , ha ha . That was, the bass was loud today. And then go on. But when you're mixing for the live stream, you are in this sort of microscope and then it's there. It's like, Oh yeah, I did that. I mixed that. And you can listen to it, which is a good thing for us as audio mixers, we can, and we have that pressure to go, well, I better get it better because everybody's noticing they're watching online and telling me X, Y, Z. And it's not just ha we mixed it up or whatever. It's it's there.

Speaker 1:

So now that we're live streaming, it's time to up your game. I guess that's a little scary, but, but we can work with that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And then she did the live stream mix a couple about a month ago, I deleted worship and everybody was out of town. I forget why. And , uh, Robby , our worship leader was like, man, that was the best live stream mix I've heard. And I was like, yeah ,

Speaker 1:

In the heart

Speaker 2:

Anyway, she has a good ear. So you gotta have a good ear and just go there. And she did exactly what I told her, build it from the bottom up, fly that ride the faders. And she did a good job. And then it's not like rocket science, but if you're feeling overwhelmed, you got to learn some of these basics. So check that out. The links to everything I said in this video, if I'm doing my job right. Are in the description.

Speaker 1:

Okay. I think we're good .

Speaker 2:

Yeah. And check out the new webinar that's coming up for those of you who are in the foundations, it's going to be, this only is going to be in depth and we're going to have audio samples on my computer. God bless you guys. I will see you either on the webinar or in the next podcast. [inaudible] .